Fabletics Membership Model is Thriving

I have become pretty addicted to the membership model of purchasing things. Like most people I know, I am constantly busy and typically overwhelmed with work, travel and activities. I order my food from a membership model that arrives in a box each week, I even order my razors in a monthly membership model. My latest craze is Fabletics. If you haven’t heard or tried Fabletics yet, give it a whirl! Kate Hudson’s creative mind helps spearhead the brand that offers high quality athletic wear for women. The twist? The athletic wear isn’t just very good quality, but it’s absolutely adorable! The line features all the latest trends in bright colors, patterns and styles with cut outs or mesh backs that have become so popular lately. The best part? It’s really affordable. Every month you are billed, but you have the opportunity to skip as many months as you would like, and it is delivered right to your door.

 

It’s no wonder why Kate Hudson was so attracted to Fabletics. She started with the company when it was a small startup with limited funding. She was the first choice of the initial cofounders due to her likeable nature, passion for health and fitness, and the fact that they knew people could just envision her wearing Fabletics to the gym or out and about town. When Kate accepted, she made it very clear that she was in it for the long haul because she really believed in Fabletics. She has always been knowns as someone who values her name and won’t put it on anything she doesn’t truly believe in – whether that is as a spokesperson or about a movie project.

 

Her instinct to believe in Fabletics was spot on, as the company is now totally in the black and worth $250 million dollars. It has millions of members that come back monthly to get new outfits. Part of the success is due to the makeup of Fabletics – a company that knows the importance of digital. Fabletics places the majority of its time and effort maintaining its online reverse showroom, rather than focusing on building new stores and driving foot traffic. This has set it far and apart in the crowd of companies in the athletic wear space and allowed it to syphon off market share from long established brands like LuLu or the lines offered at sporting good stores, as well as digital only retailors like Amazon.